RSS

WW II Soviets (Part 1: guns and soft skins)

02 May
WW II Soviets (Part 1: guns and soft skins)

After all the Kursk AAR´s last week I wanted to give you an overview of the WWII Soviets I actually have. Lets start today with guns big and small and the soft skinned vehicles.

M1937 45mm AT gun with Komsomolets tractor

M1937 45mm AT gun with Komsomolets tractor

This is a M1937 45mm anti tank gun with crew and Komsomolets tractor. All the models are from Bolt Action. The gun itself was developed in 1937 (hence the name) based on the German 37mm under a license bought from Rheinmetal, only with a larger calibre. Not that it was much more effective against armour then it´s German counterpart and was replaced in 1942 with a longer barreled version (which again ceased being effective only one year later).

The T 20 “Komsomolets” tractor was designed to tow light artillery pieces such as this 45mm anti-tank gun and the 120mm heavy mortar. It could tow the weapons themselves plus a small quantity of ammunition (in a limber that is unfortunately not supplied with the Bolt Action model) and up to six crewmen. The fully armored forward compartment provided space for the driver and vehicle commander and had a ball-mounted DT machinegun. The rear compartment held the gun crews, seated back-to-back in outward-facing bench seats.

ZIS-2 Field Guns

ZIS-3 Field Guns

These are three ZIS-3 guns. Again the guns and crews are Bolt Action. I hope one can tell from these pictures (all pictures are thumbnailed to larger versions btw.), but the one on the left has a winter whitewash. I actually have a fourth gun, but that will be pressed in German service.

The ZIS-3 was a combination of a 76,2mm gun and the carriage from the ZIS-2. While it was constructed in 1940, it had not entered service by the beginning of Operation Barbarossa (the German invasion of the Soviet Union). Germany had fooled Soviet intelligence into thinking that its tanks had armour strong enough to withstand 76mm rounds, so the Soviet had no interest in these types of guns and the developer hid the prototype from officials. When the Soviets found out, that even lighter guns were able to dispatch the German tanks in use in 1941 this changed and in the end over 103.000 were produced.

The Germans called it “Ratsch-Bumm” (“Crash-Boom”). Due to th high velocity of the round the report and the sound of the projectile hitting were almost simultaneous, which led to the term.

Is this big enough for your taste? No? Well here we go:

M1931 122mm Field Gun

M1937 152mm howitzer

The model itself is a 1:48th scale Gaso.Line model with a Bolt Action crew. Nearly 7000 M1937 152mm howitzers were build and served till the end of the war. The gun itself also saw use on the SU-152 and ISU-152 assault guns as well.

GAZ 67B

GAZ 67B

These are two GAZ 76B. They are Schuco die-casts straight from the box and only weathered with dust and mud.

GAZ AA

GAZ AA

And last but not least two 1:48th scale GAZ AA. These are UM-Models and were quiet horrible to build. Very brittle plastic and lots of flimsy parts. Surprising enough, they are quiet robust once assembled and stand up to the rigors of gameplay. Tomorrow shall either be the tanks or infantry (I have not decided yet).

Before I get I leave a few short words. Today I wanted to make the “Categories” listing of this blog easier to navigate. Why… well I was hardly using subcategories. Which had the ugly effect that if yo clicked on “Russians” for example, you would get anything from Napoleonic to modern minis and entries. Unfortunately, somewhere along the process I found that things were not working out as planned. In the end it cost me nearly two hours to fix it and I have even created more categories in the process. I shall contact the good people at WordPress to see if there is a software that actually allows me to display them as wanted. So in the end all my good intentions led to nothing. But you know the saying… “The road to hell is paved with the good intentions of honest men.” So at least I am in good company! 😉

Advertisements
 

2 responses to “WW II Soviets (Part 1: guns and soft skins)

  1. The Angry Lurker

    May 2, 2012 at 14:31

    Lovely models and amazing painting.

     
  2. 6milphil

    May 3, 2012 at 17:05

    What a fine collection, really impressive comrade. Fave is the Komsomolets tractor, but then I like light tanks.

     

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: