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Füsiliere 2tes Ostpreußisches Infanterie Regiment (IR 3) & Major von Klüx

20 Jun

Today we have the next finished unit for my Völkerschlacht project for you. These are the Füsiliere 2tes Ostpreußisches Infanterie Regiment (Infanterieregiment 3) and their detachment commander Major von Klüx. The Infantry took quiet a while to finish. Actually I made good progress on these and was just missing the skin and detailing when other matters took my attention away from minis three weeks ago, so they had to idle along.

Füsiliere 2tes Ostpreußisches Infanterie Regiment (Infanterieregiment 3):

Like most other nations of the time Prussia used the designation Fusilier to denote a type of light infantry, that acted as skirmishers. In the Prussian Army they had been formed in 1787 as independent battalions, but the reforms of 1808 absorbed the Fusiliers as the third battalion of each line infantry regiment. Now wearing blue uniforms (previously they had been green). Their uniforms and equipment was slightly different from that for their Musketier and Grenadier companions. They had black leather belts, and the wood on their muskets was blackened as well. They had no plates on their cartridge boxes (which were not worn to the front as some sources say, except for the NCO´s) and carried a straight blades Faschinenmesser instead of the short sabre. The swordknot for them would actually give me some headaches, since it was hard to find sources on its colouring. (If there is enough interest I will give some info on Prussian swordknot colours in a later post.)

Being from East Prussia their collars and cuffs were orange (turnback were red for all units).Being the second unit in line from East Prussia their shoulder boards were red.

Basing gave me some headaches at first, too. Now being Fuisilliere they are technically light infantry. Under the Republic to Empire rules light infantry are allowed to deploy the whole unit (with the exception of a close order reserve stand) as skirmishers. For this I use half bases for two men (2cm x 4cm) instead of the usual full bases for four men (4cm x 4cm). Now by 1813 many nations still bestowed the name of light infantry on their units, even though they lacked the training to perform as such. And I was not sure if this might not be the case for Prussia as well, with the harsh military reforms they had gone through. After some discussion on the forum with Barry Hilton (the creator of the rules), von Peter and most importantly the very knowledgeable Martin Kelly, I came to the conclusion that they would be very much able to act as light infantry, so half bases it was. The minis here are all from Calpe Miniatures.

2te Ostpreußische Fuisiliere

2te Ostpreußische Fuisiliere

2te Ostpreußische Fuisiliere

2te Ostpreußische Fuisiliere

2te Ostpreußische Fuisiliere, Command stand

2te Ostpreußische Fuisiliere, Command stand
[Also acting as the close order reserve and therefore the only full base]

2te Ostpreußische Fuisiliere, 1st stand

2te Ostpreußische Fuisiliere, 1st stand

2te Ostpreußische Fuisiliere, 2nd stand

2te Ostpreußische Fuisiliere, 2nd stand

2te Ostpreußische Fuisiliere, 3rd stand

2te Ostpreußische Fuisiliere, 3rd stand

2te Ostpreußische Fuisiliere, 4th stand

2te Ostpreußische Fuisiliere, 4th stand

2te Ostpreußische Fuisiliere, skirmish line

2te Ostpreußische Fuisiliere, skirmish line

Major von Klüx:

Major von Klüx was the Prussian officer to command roughly half the Prussian Advanced Guard (Prussian 1st Army Corps) infantry at Möckern. It is quiet hard to give much information about him, since all the battle reports and orders of battle never give a first name. He could be one of two sons of Major General Klüx of the Prussian Army (who died in 1805) and that he might have risen to Major-General and commanded the 9th Brigade in the 2nd Prussian Army Corps in 1814 (which would have been quiet a meteoric rise). What I know for shure is that all battle reports for Möckern have high praise for both him and the men he lead in one assault after the other on the village. In the end he was wounded, but recovered to serve on. In 1900 one of the streets in Möckern was named after him, although it does not carry the name anymore.

Now I had not planned to do this command vignette just yet. But somewhere along the route I must have ordered too many Fuisilier minis from Calpe. But I faithfully cleaned them all up, primed them and started painting them. Only when I was already done painting the collars, cuffs and shoulderboards did it dawn on me that I was painting 21 minis for a 19 mini unit. Since I did not want to paint those small parts over and to store them away until I did the next Fuisilier unit, I decided to just use them for a command vignette. Since I could find no painting for this Major Klüx, I was quiet free in my choice and chose a Perry mounted officer for him. The mini is nice and very energetic, but I was slightly disappointed by it. It seemed somewhat like a rushed job. Some parts of the his coats and around the horse’s neck show slight gaps. These are not gaps created during casting but look like someone did not properly blend the greenstuff layers before giving the master to the caster. I know the brothers are pushing out a huge number of minis these days and I would have hoped that they did not cut corners to safe the last 5 minutes. 😦

Major Klüx

Major Klüx

Major Klüx

Major Klüx

Major Klüx

Major Klüx

Major Klüx

Major Klüx

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13 responses to “Füsiliere 2tes Ostpreußisches Infanterie Regiment (IR 3) & Major von Klüx

  1. Rosbif

    June 20, 2012 at 12:23

    Lovely work, Burkhard! The weather certainly looks great for photography at the moment, too.

    I like the idea of having the reserve stand for skirmished light troops.

     
    • Burkhard

      June 20, 2012 at 12:29

      Hah… if only… it was one of those rare moments these past few weeks when it did not rain cats and dogs!

      The reserve stand always has to be there under R2E, even if you do deploy the whole regiment as skirmishers, so I did not have much choice. But I like it, too! 😉

       
  2. The Angry Lurker

    June 20, 2012 at 19:23

    My favourite army of the Napoleonic period and bloody well done and painted!

     
  3. Ray

    June 20, 2012 at 20:57

    Beautiful painting!!!!

     
  4. Burkhard

    June 20, 2012 at 22:19

    Thank you guys!

    @Fran: The Prussians are fast becoming my favourites as well, but that might either be due to the nice Calpe minis, are to my Prussian ancestors… Hard to tell! 😀

     
  5. Dave

    June 21, 2012 at 00:23

    Like Fran said “Bloody well done.” Nice job Burkhard, PF’s figures make Prussians oh so desirable, I would love to see some Austrians after he finishes with the French

     
    • Burkhard

      June 25, 2012 at 07:34

      THX Dave!

      Yes Peters minis are just great. When ever I do a unit with them, I always find myself thinking, that they were a joy to paint!

       
  6. Dean Motoyama

    June 23, 2012 at 16:22

    Great looking Prussians, Burkhard – you’ve certainly done your research on them thoroughly too. Best, Dean

     
    • Burkhard

      June 25, 2012 at 07:35

      THX Dean!

      I actually love the research part, so this only adds to the postive experience.

       
  7. Jason

    June 25, 2012 at 04:28

    Great looking unit and nice write up. Good inspiration as I’m currently starting my 1813 Prussian project. 🙂

     
    • Burkhard

      June 25, 2012 at 07:37

      THX Jason and glad to inspire!

      I will be painting some Frenchmen now (to keep me entertained) but after that it will be the 12te Reserveinfanterieregiment. Those should be even better inspiration! 😉

       
  8. paul

    October 9, 2012 at 12:30

    Lovely inspiration for my own Prussians!!!

     
    • Burkhard

      October 16, 2012 at 09:03

      Thank you Paul, menas a lot to me!

       

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