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Category Archives: Nap.: British

Giveaway minis… they are done and ready to go in the post

I had originally planned to have these done by the end of last weekend. But last weekend it was too bleeping hot to paint (these minis required a lot of detail work and the paint kept on drying on the bris before I even got close to the minis with it) and this week lots of private matters intervened, so they are only done now. The good thing is, they are ready to go in the mail tomorrow, but I wanted to show you some pictures first. So in the order that they were painted (please excuse the crappy photos… these are just quick workbench shots under artificial light, so I hope unpacking these minis will come as a pleasant surprise to the winners):

Give away group shot

The mini of Edward I “Longshanks” gave me some creeps for some reason, so I decided to start with him first. I the end this turned out unfounded and I quiet enjoyed painting him. Being from the dark ages where paintings and sculptures are essentially no good for details, I decided to take some artistic license with him, but also chose to be partly inspired by the movie Braveheart since I felt that the sculptor (eBob) did the same. I went for a dark red with the barding on the horse and the tonic of the king as opposed to the rather orange cloth used in the movie to depict some expensive, high pigment dyes.  This caused some problems, since I had decided to paint the Frisian he is riding as a chestnut (like the horse in the movie) which provided very little contrast. So I gave the horse white socks and  skin coloured mouth area which did the trick. Matt left me the option to either do the base myself of leave it plain so he can match it to his armies. I opted for the later. I always hate it when a base does not fit the army theme and I know my basing is a bit off the beaten track, so I just cleaned up the base here. I used a lipped style base as per the eBob Rebellion rules.

Give away Longshanks

Give away Longshanks 2

Up next was Napoleon. I was helped a lot by the fact that I already painted a Napoleon about two years back and could go back to my research here. All in all it was a straight and fun mini to paint and I was happy that it did not have a mould line running over his face like my Napoleon. There are different images of Napoleon out there. some with a green vest others with a white one. Just as with my mini I decided to go for green. With his white trousers and shirt as well as the grey coat he would just have been too boring without. Fran wanted no particular base since this mini will join his collection of minis painted by other bloggers, so I went for the rather more showcase´y lipped style base here and added some static grass and flower tuffs (unfortunately small ones on account of the base size).

Give away Napoleon

Give away Napoleon (back)

Last is Uxbridge. Just like Napoleon he benefitted from he fact, that I had painted this mini about two years ago and did not have to look up things like horse colors or uniform specifics. This mini held me up somewhat. A couple of years back I had put him on a large base (not sure why) and during painting I found that there were a number of places that I could not reach. So I had to remove him from the base and mount him on a film container as I do with all my Napoleonic minis for painting. But unfortunately this meant another days wait while I waited for the glue to dry. All in all I can only say that I really enjoyed painting this mini (for the second time). I think it is one of the finest in the whole Perry Napoleonic range in all its dash and splendor. Monty will most likely use this mini as the nucleus for a Napoleonic force. Since the people he will be playing with are not entirely sure on the rules they will use and how to base the commanders, I left him unbased. This will give Monty the option to base him accordingly, plus I always feel that Napoleonic commanders of this rank should have another few minis on their base and this will keep the option open for Monty as well.


Give away Uxbridge

Give away Uxbridge 2

So now I will pack these up and tomorrow they will go to their new respective homes in the UK and USA. Hope you three will like them and i will see them on your blogs when put to game (or showcase) use.

 

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Birthday / Milestone giveaway

Birthday / Milestone giveaway

So it is time for another giveaway on this blog.

So what are we celebrating? Well, a number things actually. For one this blog turned three in April. “Uh… what… April, you say! Why only now?” Because I wanted to wait for a number of other things to happen. One is that this blog reached 125 followers (actually this figure was actually breached in April, too). Some may remember, that we were higher already, but this is before I severed the connection via Facebook, which contained a number of people, who are not interested in Wargaming and therefore just muddied things up. So being back to that level was a huge milestone for me! Third we breached 250.000 hits, Oddly enough, it seems that Fran aka. the Angry Lurker was the visitor that pushed us over a milestone once more (this has happened twice in the past). Fourth, we breached 2000 comments earlier this month. Fifth… this is actually the 250th post! Oh and we have our first follower via Twitter… Fran again ;-)! All in all I feel this warrants another giveaway!

Wappen (groß)

So what is up for grabs?

Well last year, I gave away some books on historical topics. I was thinking about doing the same once more, but honestly, all books went overseas last year and the shipping on them nearly killed me! Given my financial situation I decided  to go back to basics this year and offer you some painted miniatures and these are (in order of them being drawn):

  1. Lord Uxbridge from Perry Miniatures
  2. Edward I, King of England from eBob Miniatures
  3. Napoleon (on foot) by Perry Miniatures
Giveaway miniatures

Giveaway miniatures

All of these come from my own stocks and were not donated. The minis will be painted over the next few weeks, but it might take until after the draw that they are actually finished. Depending on request I will either change the basing on these minis or send them un-based. To give you and idea of what the finial minis will look like… here is a photo of the Uxbridge mini I painted for myself two years ago:

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Should you feel that you are not interested in any of these minis… well you can always have something else painted by me. Essentially send me a substitute (one 28mm mini or four 20mm or six 15mm minis or even a single 20mm or 15mm vehicle are fine, but talk to me… depending on the topic this can be expanded), tell me how you would like it painted and it will be done!

Now what do you have to do to get into the draw?

  1. Comment on this post and if you prefer one of the above miniatures, mention it. If it is still available at the time your name gets drawn, it is yours.
  2. Be a subscriber to this blog. There are essentially four ways to do this. (i) If you have a WordPress account you can follow this blogs, via WordPress. (ii) You can subscribe via eMail (third option from the top on the right). (iii) Or you can follow via Twitter (second option from the top on the right). (iv) The fourth option is to have this blog on your blogroll on your own blog (I know there are people who follow blogs that way). While you can follow this blog via RSS feed, there is unfortunately no way for me to know, so that is excluded. You need to be a subscriber at the time of the draw obviously, but I would be happy if you remained one after it, too!
  3. You do not need to post about this give-away on your blog. But if you do with a link back to this post, you get a second ticket in the draw (please mention it in the comments here, as that makes it easier to check).

And this is it. The draw will be held on the 13th of this July 0800h CET, so make sure you toss your hat in the ring by that time! Good luck!

 

Napoleonic 95th Rifles (Analogue Hobbies Painting Challenge entry #6)

Now even though the title says that these minis are my 6th entry into the Painting Challenge, this is only half-true. These are also my entry into the 3rd La Bricole Winter Painting Challenge with the fitting title “Deploy Skirmishers”. As the title suggests, this one is about light troops. I have to admit, that it caught me quiet of guard. Usually the La Bricole Challenges run for some time, but this one runs “only” for about a month and the first I heard about it, was when it started. With the time taken by private matters (like looking for a new job) and the Analogue Hobbies Challenge I was sure I did not have the time to get the minis for a unit of my choice from storage and clean them up. Luckily I had cleaned up and primed a bunch of 95th Rifles minis some years ago and had put them away, when I concentrated on my French and Prussians for Möckern. So I only had to glue them onto the film containers I use for painting and the party could begin.
I had hoped that these would paint up a little faster and that I could paint an entry for the next fortnight theme (Hero or Heroic group) on the Analogue Hobbies Challenge at the same time, but some time last week it became clear that this was not going to happen. At the same time I was in no mood to halt work on these for something else. Thinking about the exploits of the 95th I was sure, that that could be passed as heroes. And it even got me thinking some more. Is not every soldier a hero in a sense. I mean it takes a good amount of courage to march out into a field to face thousands of other men who are there with the intention of ending your life. I think to do that takes courage and heroism. And since Curt allowed them to be entered, I can not be that wrong!
2007 Royal mail stamp showing a rifleman form the 95th Rifles

2007 Royal mail stamp showing a rifleman form the 95th Rifles

Now on to the Rifles themselves. The unit was created in January 1800 as the “Experimental Corps of Riflemen” to provide sharpshooters, scouts and skirmishers. They were renamed the “95th Regiment of Foot (Rifles)” in 1803 (in between they were also renamed “The Rifle Corps”). In 1805 and 1806 they were sent to Germany to liberate Hannover from France. Five companies had a brief stint in South America where they were surrendered by their commanding officer, but after negotiations they were allowed to leave. At the same time the rest of the Regiment accompanied Athur Welsley (the later Duke Wellington) to Denmark. They were also send to Schweden, but never left their vessels.

Their real rise to fame began during the Peninsular Campaign. Here they fought in every major engagement and served right from the landings at Mondego Bay till the advance into France. As part of the Light Brigade they were always in the thick of battle. One of their most heroic feats (here we come full circle with the fortnight theme) was the battle of  Battle of San Marcial where a company under the command of Captain Daniel Cadoux held off an entire French division at Vera before withdrawing. They inflicted 231 casualties and suffering just 14 killed, unfortunately including Cadoux.

After Napoleons first abdication, they returned to England for R&R and indeed many men who saw their enlistments end, left the regiment. But with Napoleons return to power, many of them returned to the unit and the unit returned to Europe to fight again, seeing action at boy Quatre Bras and Waterloo.

For those who want to get some idea of their exploits during the Napoleonic era (and not only from a TV series starring Sean Bean [I like him as an actor and always did, but I simply do not believe in Bernhard Cornwell or Hollywood teaching history]) there is a very good book by Mark Urban simply called “Rifles”.

OK, enough of that and on to the minis, shall we! All of these minis are Perry Miniatures (two of them plastic, the other metal). There is twenty of them in total, which under the Republic to Empire rules (1:20 ratio) will allow me to field them at full strength for Quatre Bras or if I remove a few minis, for Waterloo as well. I did this with my Black Watch and I am going this with all my Napoleonic British, since I do not play the Peninsular and this will allow me to replay either battle.

I have to say, they are some of the Perrys best minis, since each and every one has lots of character (often you only find that with the command packs or special packs). None the less the casting quality still was bad, as usual. I simply cannot understand how they can sculpt such nice minis and be so horrible on quality control. I know these came from one of the first batches, so they should have been good, but even though I took great care to clean them up, I still found some flash or chimneys where I did not expect them and had to remove them during painting. All in all I went and did a fast job on these to be able to finish them in time (and still had to pull a night shift on the last night), so they might now look as nice as my other Napoleonic minis. But before anyone asks… yes the numbers on the backpacks are freehand!
95th Rifles (front view)

95th Rifles (front view)

95th Rifles (rear view)

95th Rifles (rear view)

95th Rifles (command stand)

95th Rifles (command stand)

95th Rifles (officer and bugler)

95th Rifles (officer and bugler)

95th Rifles (front view)

95th Rifles (front view)

Again they were based on half bases (except for the command stand) to allow me to use them in full skirmish deployment as well, just like what I described with my other light troops.

95th Rifles (skirmish formation)

95th Rifles (skirmish formation)

For those of you wondering about the other entries, here is the link to the special page Curt set up for the first fortnight theme and for people to cast their votes for favourites.
Up next we shall stay British, but this time we will be back in WWII.
 

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Republic to Empire game, late 1813

After not playing a single Napoleonics game last year, it was finally time to have one again. And this time not only in 15mm, but with all the 28mms I have painted lately we could play in 28mm.

We had to improvise a little bit though. The Allies consisted of three brigades. One Prussian cavalry brigade (Leibhusaren, Brandenburg Uhlanen, Schlesische Landwehr Kavallerie), one mixed infantry Brigade (42nd Highland, Bayrisches Infanterieregiment Sachsen-Hildburghausen, 2te Ostpreußische Fuisiliere and 13te Schlesische Landwehr), a Prussian Infantry Brigade (Gardejäger/Ostpreußische Jäger, 12te Reserveinfanterie,  14te and 15te Schlesische Landwehr) and an independent 6pdr battery. The majority of officers were British.

The French did not have these kinds of problems and could bring up their numbers on their own. There was one infantry brigade consisting of 3 units of line and one of Légère, another one consisting of three battalions of Marine Artillery (fighting as infantry), the Regiment Joseph Napoleon and another unit of Légère. They also had a unit of Cuirassiers and two batteries of artillery (one consisting of 6pdrs and one of 12pdrs).

Deployment was straightforward for both sides. I (playing the Prussians) deployed from left to right my artillery, followed by the cavalry, mixed infantry Brigade and the Prussian Brigade. All started  with advance orders and deployed mostly in line of column of attack formations. The leading battalions deployed skirmishers, the Jäger battalion in full skirmish deployment.

The Allies

The Allies

The French (played by Dirk) deployed left to right (seen from the Prussian side) their Marines Brigade with the Cuirassiers behind them, the limbered up 6pdrs, delpoyed 12pdr and last the remaining Brigade. They were on move orders, mostly deployed in attack columns as well, but had not skirmishers deployed.

The terrain was also quiet open with a few fields and valleys and that was about it.

Starting positions

Starting positions

The French activated first and only advanced towards the Prussian lines, with the Cuirassiers staying behind. The 12pdrs opened up on the Bavarians and caused them some casualties and that was about it.

Now the Prussians activated. Both the infantry Brigades advanced with the Schützen pouring some fire into the opposing French infantry causing them minor casualties. The Prussian artillery fired on the Regiment Joseph Napoleon causing them the first casualties. This would actually be their last fire since future events and their position at the far end of the line would leave them without targets. The cavalry activated, with the CnC attaching himself to the Leibhussaren to lead them to the right flank. I had managed to roll quiet good when it came to command points for that round. Therefore the cavalry received new orders putting them to attack and still perform according to that order. The Brandenburg Uhlanen decided to charge the Marine Artillery battalion straight ahead. Not having time to change to square they only managed to pull off a defensive volley, which could not deter the Uhlans. They smashed into the infantry and using their lances virtually cut them to pieces. Far less than a quarter of their number remained and were run down by the Uhlans… they were out of the game. Their destruction also shook the morale of the Légère next to them.

Charge of the Brandenburg Uhlanen

Charge of the Brandenburg Uhlanen

Now the Landwehr cavalry decided to try the same with the Légère bringing up the French flank. But their mettle failed them and they did not even initiate the charge.

Now the initiative passed back to the French (we failed to roll initiative for the first two rounds). The next Marine battalion moved into the flank of the Uhlans and poured musket fire into them. This was enough to make them lose their nerve and they retreated backwards. The 6pdrs having moved forward unlimbered and fired at the Black Watch causing them some casualties. The 12 pdrs kept their fire on the Bavarians causing them yet more losses. Both units kept their nerve. The Cuirassiers reformed from column of march to column of squadrons to attack the allied infantry, but they too did not even initiate their charge.

Opposing lines

Opposing lines

Now Prussians were to act again. And I rolled exceptionally good when it came to command points. The mixed national brigade was therefore able to change their order to attack and even advanced further towards the enemy. The Highlanders and Bavarians recalled their skirmishers and the Bavarians even attempted to charge the battery of 6 pdrs. But they too could not sum up the nerve due to the losses already incurred. The other infantry brigade only managed to change their orders to attack as well. The Jäger caused further losses on the French opposing them, while the rest of their Brigade moved to link up with them. All these exploitation moves by the infantry had eaten up virtually all the points. Therefore the cavalry could only act upon their Brigade order. The Hussars moved further to the right flank accompanied be the CnC, the Uhlans reformed inside a wheat field. The Landwehr cavalry again tried to charge the Légère. This time they were able to initiate the charge and caught the Légère by surprise. They tried to run but the Landwehr caught up with them and trampled them down, spelling their end.

Run them down

Run them down

With the mixed infantry battalion being right in front of the enemy it was now crucial for the Prussians to win initiative (this being the first time we remembered to do so) and guess what… they failed by the highest margin possible. 😉

The French were quiet afraid of the infantry to their front and both French artillery batteries poured their fire into the Bavarians. Although starting as the largest battalion on the Allied side, this virtually annihilated them. The few men left had enough and fled the field. The Marines that had already fired at the Uhlans the previous turn turned around and together with their sister battalion fired at the 42nd Highland. The losses were average and the Scotsmen stood their ground. Otherwise their was just some more maneuvering on the French part and that was it.

Closing in

Closing in

Now the Allies had to fight back. While the Uhlans and Landwehr cavalry only brought themselves into position for a charge next round, the Hussars had reached the other flank and attempted to charge the French infantry on that flank, but as seemed the norm… failed to initiate the charge.

The right hand infantry brigade advanced and passed through the screen formed by the Jäger. The lead battalion poured some fire into the French for some further losses. But the main event was in the center. The Black Watch charged the Marine Artillery to their front, they only suffered light losses, but caused them severe losses. The French Marines broke and fled. Seeing this the Cuirassiers also felt threatened and withdrew to the near woods. The 12te Schlesische Landwehr attempted to charge the Marines in the flank of the British infantry, but were halted by the defensive fire. Now the only thing that remained was the attack on the French 6pdrs. The fusiliers had to take this job. But the French would not allow that without resistance. The artillery fired canister rounds into them causing them severe losses. But still the Prussians came on. In the ensuing close combat more than half the artillery crew were killed, wounded or taken prisoner. the rest left their guns and fled.

The final charge

The final charge

This was it… one battery out of action and one infantry battalion had lost so many units that it had become ineffective and the Cuirassiers would have to reform as well. The French called it a day.

Final positions

Final positions

In the end this was a good game spread out over two sessions. We refreshed our rule knowledge and learned a few new things. What we will definitely have to change was the table size. We did played on a 1,5m deep and 2,5, wide table. We failed to realize the for 28mm this was not deep enough, as we started the game with the Prussians being well into range for the 12pdrs and the French already being threatened by the cavalry. Otherwise it was good fun.

 

 

Henry William Paget, 1. Marquess of Anglesey, Earl of Uxbridge

Henry William Paget, 1. Marquess of Anglesey, Earl of Uxbridge

So the minis for the Lord Uxbridge base have been for some days now, but they had been causing some problems. First of all the photos I took of the finished models before basing them (and I mean all of them) turned out somewhat blurry. Not sure if it was the sensor or anything, but bottom line is… they were useless and I could not post a final WIP. Sorry about that! When I applied the first coat of varnish it turned glossy (new can that I probably did not shake well enough) and it took another three coats to turn it matt. This took some time, since I had wait for each coat to dry completely through. But on Saturday it finally turned matt and I could work on the basing. Before I go on to the photos here is some info on the big man himself:

Henry William Paget was born in London, as Henry Bayly (his father assumed the name Paget in 1770), he was the eldest son of Henry Paget, 1st Earl of Uxbridge, by his wife Jane, daughter of the Very Reverend Arthur Champagné, Dean of Clonmacnoise, Ireland.  He was the oldest brother to Captain William Paget, Sir Arthur Paget, General Sir Edward Paget, Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Paget and Berkeley.

At first he entered politics and became a member of parliament at the 1790 general election as member for Caernarfon in Wales. He held this seat until the 1796 general election when his brother Edward was elected unopposed in his place. He then represented Milborne Port from 1796 until he resigned his seat in 1804 by appointment as Steward of the Chiltern Hundreds, and again from the 1806 election to January 1810, when he took the Chiltern Hundreds again.

At the outbreak of the French Revolutionary Wars, Paget raised the regiment of Staffordshire volunteers and was given the temporary rank of lieutenant-colonel in 1793. As the 80th Foot, the corps took part in the Flanders campaign of 1794 under Paget’s command. In 1795 he was made a lieutenant-colonel of the 16th Light Dragoons. In 1796 he was made a colonel and by 1801 he had become colonel of the 7th Light Dragoons. In 1802 he was promoted major-general, and six years later lieutenant-general. He commanded the cavalry for Sir John Moore’s army during the 1809 Corunna campaign. His only war service from 1809 to 1815 was in the disastrous Walcheren expedition (1809), in which he commanded a division.

In 1815, he was appointed cavalry commander in Belgium. On the eve of Waterloo, Paget had his command extended by Wellington so as to include the whole of the allied cavalry and horse artillery. He handily covered the retirement of the Anglo-Allies from Quatre Bras to Waterloo on 17 June, and on 18 June led the spectacular cavalry charge of the British centre, which checked and in part routed D’Erlon’s corps d’armée. One of the last cannon shots fired that day hit Paget in the right leg, necessitating its amputation.

Henry William Paget, 1. Marquess of Anglesey, Earl of Uxbridge

Henry William Paget, 1. Marquess of Anglesey, Earl of Uxbridge

In 1819 Paget, now Marquess of Anglesey, became full general and at the coronation of George IV, he acted as Lord High Steward of England. In April 1827, he became a member of the Canning administration, taking the post of Master-General of the Ordnance and becoming a member of the Privy Council. Under the Wellington administration, he accepted the appointment of Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (March 1828). In December 1828, he addressed a letter to the Roman Catholic primate of Ireland stating his belief in the need for Catholic emancipation, which led to his recall by the government. On the formation of Earl Grey’s administration in November 1830, he again became lord-lieutenant of Ireland. In July 1833, the ministry resigned over the Irish question, he spent thirteen years out of office, then joined Lord John Russell’s administration in July 1846 as master-general of the ordnance, finally retiring in March 1852 with the rank of field-marshal and colonel of the Royal Horse Guards. He also held the honorary posts of Lord Lieutenant of Anglesey between 1812 and 1854 and Lord Lieutenant of Staffordshire between 1849 and 1854.

Lord Anglesey died April 29, 1854, and was buried at Lichfield Cathedral, where a monument is erected to his honour.

He was quiet a fertile character. He fathered eight children with his first wife, Lady Caroline Elizabeth Villiers, from whom he was divorced in 1810. And another nine with Lady Charlotte Cadogan, former wife of Lord Henry Wellesley, Wellington’s brother.

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

 

Lord Uxbridge WIP part 6, non metalic metal technique silver

Lord Uxbridge WIP part 6, non metalic metal technique silver

Ok the last few days I did not get as much work done on these as I wanted. While I painted a lot on Friday, it was not minis, but I helped my better halfs sister paint her flat. Saturday and Sunday were spend painting minis. And today? Well today I helped a friend of mine cart 21 metric tons of soil into his new garden. I do not even want to know what my shoulders will feel like tomorrow!

But on Saturday I did the NMM silver on Captain Seymour. And I shall use him to go through the paces with you.

Now the first step with NMM silver is simple as it was with gold… you need a base colour. Here I chose Vallejo Panzer Aces “Feldgrau” (338). Just block the silver areas in.

The next colour is the first highlight. Here I went for Vallejo “Pale Greyblue” (907). This colour is used to pick out the highlights. So I paint the edges and raised points (folds or tassels) with it. Same goes if the fabric has a pattern stitched into it. In this case the belt for the cartridge box has interlocking triangles stitched on. Pick such patterns out with this colour as well. If you need to do some freehand patterns (like the cyphers on the saddle cloth) pick your spots where you feel a highlight should be, usually at spots where lines cross or make turns.

The final colours is used to give extreme highlights. In this case I used Vallejo “Silver Grey” (883). As with the gold you should go easy with this one. I found it best to paint besides the highlight from the second step or just put a dot at the end of such a highlight for best effect. For small tassels you can make a line of small dots to accentuate the fabric. Unfortunately it does not really come out on the photos, so you will have to look pretty close.

Captain Seymour, step by step NMM

Captain Seymour, step by step NMM

On sunday I saw to it, that the minis progressed in general. Did the highlights on the light blue, and red accents on the cyphers. I also did the black items (sabretache and sabre belts, shoes, visors…) and the highlights for the black. For highlights on black I use a very dark blue, that is almost black (did the same for the highlights on the horse by the way). In real life black never seems to have grey highlights (unless it is faded fabrics), so this gives the best results. Also started on the skin and did the eyes. Lets see how far I get tomorrow.

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s (WIP 5)

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s (WIP 5)

Tomorrow I shall post some photos of the Offensive Miniatures French artillery that I painted the last month.

 

Lord Uxbridge WIP part 5

Lord Uxbridge WIP part 5

Ok, I got a little less done yesterday than expected. There simply was too much detail that needed to be done on all that NMM gold. Anyway, I finished the NMM gold on all 4 minis, did the brown fur on Uxbridge´s pelisse and Captain Seymour´s busby and shaded those (only requiring highlights now) and did the light blue base for the Hussars shakos and the busby sack.

So todays photos only show how the NMM gold turned out on all the three minis where I used the technique. If everything goes to plan I will do the NMM silver on Seymour today and some other general details.

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s (WIP 4 front)

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s (WIP 4 front)

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s (WIP 4 back)

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s (WIP 4 back)

 

 

Lord Uxbridge WIP part 4, non metalic metal technique gold

Lord Uxbridge WIP part 4, non metalic metal technique gold

While I made some progress on the non metallic metal (NMM) gold for this set, I did not finish it, much like I had expected yesterday. Uxbridge only has the basic colour done, same as CPT Seymour (although he only has a little gold on his sash anyway), MAJ Thornhill has the second step finished as well and CPT Wildmann  also received his third and final step. Well at least on one side, since I wanted to go through the paces of NMM gold showing pictures of him.

Now the first step with NMM gold is simple… you need a base colour. In this case I chose Vallejo Panzer Aces “New Wood” (311) since I wanted a bright gold in the end. If I want one that is a little darker, I go for Vallejo Game Colour “Cobra Leather” (040) [Games Workshops old Snakebite Leather is the same colour]. Edit (2014): These days I use Cobra Leather as a base for both the bright and dark versions, as I found it gives either a more lively look! 

The next colour is the first highlight. In this case I chose Coat d´arms “Horse Tone Dun” (221). Again if I want a little darker gold I go for a different colour, Vallejo “Green Ochre” (914). This colour is used to pick out the highlights. So I paint the edges and raised points (folds or tassels) with it. Same goes if the fabric has a pattern stitched into it. In this case the belt for the cartridge box has interlocking triangles stitched on (which is unfortunately not visible from this angle), the sabretache a zig-zig pattern (better seen in the third step photo). Pick such patterns out with this colour as well. If you need to do some freehand patterns (like the cyphers on the saddle cloth) pick your spots where you feel a highlight should be, usually at spots where lines cross or make turns.

The final colours is used to give extreme highlights. In this case I used Vallejo Game colour “Elfric Flesh” (098). If I want a darker gold I go for a creme colour (unfortunately I can not give you a code here since I bought it without a label from Foundry). Go easy with this one. I found it best to paint besides the highlight from the second step or just put a dot at the end of such a highlight for best effect. If you look at the cypher on the sabretache, I overdid it there and painted most of the second step over, which resulted in a poor result since the contrast is too strong. I will have to go back to that one and redo it with some Dun colour. For small tassels you can make a line of small dots to accentuate the fabric.

Captain Wildmann, step by step NMM

Captain Wildmann
step by step NMM

Hope to finish the NMM gold today and start on the caps, fur trimming for Uxbride´s pelisse and the NMM silver.

 

Lord Uxbridge WIP part 3

Lord Uxbridge WIP part 3

On Monday I only got to spend about 10 minutes on these fine chaps, so I did not post an update yesterday. But yesterday, they advanced further. I blocked out the dark blue areas and did the highlights on those. Those were done by simply drybrushing the lighter shade on. Now this might look a bit over the top right now with strong contrasts and larger “blotches” of light or dark areas, but the later will be broken up a lot once all the tassels and gear are painted. Which is also why the strong contrast is need, for the smaller areas to still stand out. If this does not make too much sense, I hope it will do later.

Afterwards a did the black lamp wool saddle covers for the ADC. Mainly because they would be harder to do later on and since they have red fringes and dogsteeth and red was he next colour to paint. Which brings me to the red. The collar and cuffs of Uxbridge´s uniform are red, as well parts of the strap for the cartridge box straps, the belts, sashes and sabretaches (except for the 17th Hussars). I used the Andrea Red set for this which has real nice tones (and smell of vanilla for some strange reason), the only gripe being that the base colour does not cover 100%. I then did some shadows and highlights on these, always skipping one shade. I did this since all the red areas will be fairly small (in some cases only a 1mm or less line) or in case of the sabretaches covered by lots of gold. A soft transition between the reds would not stand out and this way it will still pop.

Once the was done I began with the base coat for the NMM (non metallic metal) technique gold which you can see on the soldier on the left. And this is it for now.

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s (WIP 3)

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s (WIP 3)

I hope to finish the rest of the gold today, but that might not happen, since there is lots to do. Since the minis for the ADC´s do not have the laces on the breast sculpted on, all of this will have to be done freehand, which will not speed things up. I just hope that it does not get too warm today, since this would make all this fine work so much harder (the small amounts of paint on the brush will have dried after just one stroke, making frequent cleaning and shaping of the brush necessary).

 

Lord Uxbridge WIP part 2

Lord Uxbridge WIP part 2

This is going to be a short post since I spend very little time painting yesterday. Between doing some work in the house and deciding whether it was safe to sit outside or if the weather would turn bad, I spend most of the day.

Anyway, some progress was made after all. The horses are finished now. I added more shadows or highlights to the hides, did the manes, the grey got his dappling and the chestnut his socks. I painted hooves (lacquered grey), teeth and eyes. One word on the eyes. I only paint them in black or very dark brown. If you look at a real horse the eyelids cover most of the eyes and you only see the pupils. The only time you see the whites is when a horse is scared or blown. Since there is no reason for these steeds to be either, they are only black here. Personally it always freaks me out to see the whites in a horses eyes painted. In case anyone wonders, I paint the leather work (bridles, saddle, stir-ups straps and so on) after I am done with the riders. I found this works better for my style of painting.

Otherwise I only started painting the outlines of those uniform items and saddle cloths that will be dark blue. I had planned to have them blocked out and highlighted by the evening, but did not find the time… so be it. Lets see how much I will get done today.

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s (WIP 2)

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s (WIP 2)