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Category Archives: Republic to Empire

Westpreussisches Grenadierbattalion

1tes und 2tes Westpreussisches Infanterieregiment

1tes und 2tes Westpreussisches Infanterieregiment
[Knötel, Uniformenkunde, Band II. Nr. 45]

After a few weeks the Prussian Westpreussisches Grenadierbattalion for my Möckern (Völkerschlacht of Leipzig) project are finally finished. All minis are Calpe in 28mm (with the exception of the French casualty on the skirmisher base, which is a Perry plastic).

While the Knötel print to the left depicts the Musketiere from both the 1st and 2nd Westpreussische Infanterieregimenter, these can be seen as good representations of the minis painted here, since the only difference was the colours of the swordknots.

Now the regiment had quite an illustrious career during the Befreiungskriege seeing action at Möckern (the one in April 1813 not the one I am painting for), Königswartha, Groß-Görschen, Bautzen, Dresden, Culm, Wachau, Leipzig. In 1814 they ended up in Paris after long campaigning and were called up in 1815 once more to fight at Ligny and many of the smaller battles leading to it and later on into France.

At Möckern (Leipzig) they fought with 582 men, which translates into 29 minis and four skirmishers at Republic to Empires 1:20 ratio.

I have to admit, that while this is not the largest Napoleonic unit I ever painted, this is the largest I painted in one go (as opposed to small batches) and this was a huge mistake. When painting every single colour takes at least an hour, you start to lose interest somewhere along the route. Anyway… they are now finished and I am happy with the results. But as a result though the next things on my table are smaller batches. Already finished four Austrian Jäger (they are awaiting their varnish and basing) and next are Prussian and French officers.

As you know I have been painting units from von Yorck´s advance guard at Leipzig for some time now, but this is the first regular unit with a flag for me. All the others have either been Landwehr and Reserves with non-regulation flags, or Schützen and Fuisiliere without any. It is strange what a change something like a different type of flag can be, but it really was for me when done. Together with the posh (at least for Prussian standards) grenadier uniforms, it was a real joy to see them done. I hope they will do me proud on the table. One thing that left me slightly irritated was the colours of their flag, yellow on blue, which I would rather associate with Silesia. If anyone can shed some light into this I would be more than happy to hear why this is so.

Now photographing these mini gave me a huge headache. With their muskets in front of their bodies, I arranged the minis in a way, that they would not interfere with one another no matter in which formation I placed the bases. Unfortunately, this also meant, that I would always end up with at least two faces being obscured by a musket. In the end I gave up, so the majority of photos will by group shots this time. Hope you can forgive me, since you will be able to click them for larger versions!

Westpreussisches Grenadierbattalion (skirmishers deployed)

Westpreussisches Grenadierbattalion (skirmishers deployed)

Westpreussisches Grenadierbattalion

Westpreussisches Grenadierbattalion

Westpreussisches Grenadierbattalion (command base)

Westpreussisches Grenadierbattalion (command base)

Westpreussisches Grenadierbattalion (first coy base Nr.1)

Westpreussisches Grenadierbattalion (first coy base Nr.1)

Westpreussisches Grenadierbattalion (first coy base Nr. 2)

Westpreussisches Grenadierbattalion (first coy base Nr. 2)

Westpreussisches Grenadierbattalion (skirmishers)

Westpreussisches Grenadierbattalion (skirmishers)

Westpreussisches Grenadierbattalion (top view)

Westpreussisches Grenadierbattalion (top view)

 

Republic to Empire game, late 1813

After not playing a single Napoleonics game last year, it was finally time to have one again. And this time not only in 15mm, but with all the 28mms I have painted lately we could play in 28mm.

We had to improvise a little bit though. The Allies consisted of three brigades. One Prussian cavalry brigade (Leibhusaren, Brandenburg Uhlanen, Schlesische Landwehr Kavallerie), one mixed infantry Brigade (42nd Highland, Bayrisches Infanterieregiment Sachsen-Hildburghausen, 2te Ostpreußische Fuisiliere and 13te Schlesische Landwehr), a Prussian Infantry Brigade (Gardejäger/Ostpreußische Jäger, 12te Reserveinfanterie,  14te and 15te Schlesische Landwehr) and an independent 6pdr battery. The majority of officers were British.

The French did not have these kinds of problems and could bring up their numbers on their own. There was one infantry brigade consisting of 3 units of line and one of Légère, another one consisting of three battalions of Marine Artillery (fighting as infantry), the Regiment Joseph Napoleon and another unit of Légère. They also had a unit of Cuirassiers and two batteries of artillery (one consisting of 6pdrs and one of 12pdrs).

Deployment was straightforward for both sides. I (playing the Prussians) deployed from left to right my artillery, followed by the cavalry, mixed infantry Brigade and the Prussian Brigade. All started  with advance orders and deployed mostly in line of column of attack formations. The leading battalions deployed skirmishers, the Jäger battalion in full skirmish deployment.

The Allies

The Allies

The French (played by Dirk) deployed left to right (seen from the Prussian side) their Marines Brigade with the Cuirassiers behind them, the limbered up 6pdrs, delpoyed 12pdr and last the remaining Brigade. They were on move orders, mostly deployed in attack columns as well, but had not skirmishers deployed.

The terrain was also quiet open with a few fields and valleys and that was about it.

Starting positions

Starting positions

The French activated first and only advanced towards the Prussian lines, with the Cuirassiers staying behind. The 12pdrs opened up on the Bavarians and caused them some casualties and that was about it.

Now the Prussians activated. Both the infantry Brigades advanced with the Schützen pouring some fire into the opposing French infantry causing them minor casualties. The Prussian artillery fired on the Regiment Joseph Napoleon causing them the first casualties. This would actually be their last fire since future events and their position at the far end of the line would leave them without targets. The cavalry activated, with the CnC attaching himself to the Leibhussaren to lead them to the right flank. I had managed to roll quiet good when it came to command points for that round. Therefore the cavalry received new orders putting them to attack and still perform according to that order. The Brandenburg Uhlanen decided to charge the Marine Artillery battalion straight ahead. Not having time to change to square they only managed to pull off a defensive volley, which could not deter the Uhlans. They smashed into the infantry and using their lances virtually cut them to pieces. Far less than a quarter of their number remained and were run down by the Uhlans… they were out of the game. Their destruction also shook the morale of the Légère next to them.

Charge of the Brandenburg Uhlanen

Charge of the Brandenburg Uhlanen

Now the Landwehr cavalry decided to try the same with the Légère bringing up the French flank. But their mettle failed them and they did not even initiate the charge.

Now the initiative passed back to the French (we failed to roll initiative for the first two rounds). The next Marine battalion moved into the flank of the Uhlans and poured musket fire into them. This was enough to make them lose their nerve and they retreated backwards. The 6pdrs having moved forward unlimbered and fired at the Black Watch causing them some casualties. The 12 pdrs kept their fire on the Bavarians causing them yet more losses. Both units kept their nerve. The Cuirassiers reformed from column of march to column of squadrons to attack the allied infantry, but they too did not even initiate their charge.

Opposing lines

Opposing lines

Now Prussians were to act again. And I rolled exceptionally good when it came to command points. The mixed national brigade was therefore able to change their order to attack and even advanced further towards the enemy. The Highlanders and Bavarians recalled their skirmishers and the Bavarians even attempted to charge the battery of 6 pdrs. But they too could not sum up the nerve due to the losses already incurred. The other infantry brigade only managed to change their orders to attack as well. The Jäger caused further losses on the French opposing them, while the rest of their Brigade moved to link up with them. All these exploitation moves by the infantry had eaten up virtually all the points. Therefore the cavalry could only act upon their Brigade order. The Hussars moved further to the right flank accompanied be the CnC, the Uhlans reformed inside a wheat field. The Landwehr cavalry again tried to charge the Légère. This time they were able to initiate the charge and caught the Légère by surprise. They tried to run but the Landwehr caught up with them and trampled them down, spelling their end.

Run them down

Run them down

With the mixed infantry battalion being right in front of the enemy it was now crucial for the Prussians to win initiative (this being the first time we remembered to do so) and guess what… they failed by the highest margin possible. 😉

The French were quiet afraid of the infantry to their front and both French artillery batteries poured their fire into the Bavarians. Although starting as the largest battalion on the Allied side, this virtually annihilated them. The few men left had enough and fled the field. The Marines that had already fired at the Uhlans the previous turn turned around and together with their sister battalion fired at the 42nd Highland. The losses were average and the Scotsmen stood their ground. Otherwise their was just some more maneuvering on the French part and that was it.

Closing in

Closing in

Now the Allies had to fight back. While the Uhlans and Landwehr cavalry only brought themselves into position for a charge next round, the Hussars had reached the other flank and attempted to charge the French infantry on that flank, but as seemed the norm… failed to initiate the charge.

The right hand infantry brigade advanced and passed through the screen formed by the Jäger. The lead battalion poured some fire into the French for some further losses. But the main event was in the center. The Black Watch charged the Marine Artillery to their front, they only suffered light losses, but caused them severe losses. The French Marines broke and fled. Seeing this the Cuirassiers also felt threatened and withdrew to the near woods. The 12te Schlesische Landwehr attempted to charge the Marines in the flank of the British infantry, but were halted by the defensive fire. Now the only thing that remained was the attack on the French 6pdrs. The fusiliers had to take this job. But the French would not allow that without resistance. The artillery fired canister rounds into them causing them severe losses. But still the Prussians came on. In the ensuing close combat more than half the artillery crew were killed, wounded or taken prisoner. the rest left their guns and fled.

The final charge

The final charge

This was it… one battery out of action and one infantry battalion had lost so many units that it had become ineffective and the Cuirassiers would have to reform as well. The French called it a day.

Final positions

Final positions

In the end this was a good game spread out over two sessions. We refreshed our rule knowledge and learned a few new things. What we will definitely have to change was the table size. We did played on a 1,5m deep and 2,5, wide table. We failed to realize the for 28mm this was not deep enough, as we started the game with the Prussians being well into range for the 12pdrs and the French already being threatened by the cavalry. Otherwise it was good fun.

 

 

37eme – 1 Légère

Now these minis took me a good while. I started these in November, but between work and renovating the kitchen (as luck would have it we had a burst pipe on the other side of the wall last week, which means we will have to do one wall anew once it is dry 😦 ) meant I could only base them this week. These are the next unit for my Völkerschlacht von Leipzig / Möckern project and shall bring the French Légère Regiment closer tom completion.

As I said when I presented their 2nd battalion, the 37eme actually had a pretty short service record. It was created in 1812 from various reserve companies and was the highest numbered Légère Regiment under Napoleon (and I fear in all French history as well). It fought at Lutzen, Bautzen, Dresden, Wendisch-Carsdorff, Falkenkayn, Leipzig, and Hanau in 1813 and Saint-Avold, Vassy, La Rothiere, Brienne, Champaubert, Vauchamps, Mormans, Meaux, Reims, and Paris in 1814. After Napoleons abdication it was disbanded and not raised again after his restoration. It never managed to gain battle honours to its flag.

At 355 men this was actually the 2nd largest of the 37eme´s three battalions at Leipzig / Möckern. Under the Republic to Empire rules means 18 minis. Again I put them all (except for the command base) on half-bases due to their ability to deploy the full regiment as skirmishers.

Again the minis are Perry plastics, with the four minis for the command base and the 1st Coy officer being metal minis from the twins. As before the plastic minis had the cuffs cut off and the pointed cuffs of the Légère painted on. I am not sure if the metal minis actually come from a Légère set, but since they were missing the square cuffs they painted nicely as Légère.

Please bear with me on these photos… I was trying out a new camera and have to admit… I am not entirely happy with the results yet.

37eme - 1 Légère

37eme – 1 Légère in march column

37eme - 1 Légère (Chasseuers 1st Coy.)

37eme – 1 Légère (Chasseuers 1st Coy.)

37eme - 1 Légère (Chasseuers 2nd, 3rd and 4th Coy.)

37eme – 1 Légère (Chasseuers 2nd, 3rd and 4th Coy.)

37eme - 1 Légère (Carabiniers & Voltigeurs)

37eme – 1 Légère (Carabiniers & Voltigeurs)

In other news… I am also about to pay the ferryman for my participation in the Analogue Hobbies Painting Challenge, by painting up the mandatory 28mm Samurai. The mini is from JC Miniatures (28mm) Samurai line. I initially planned to do two, but these minis are meant for slotta bases and Curt had asked for them to be based thin. With this one the tap removed quiet fine, but with the other one, I managed to rip off both feet. Since the Katana was broken anyway, I decided to focus on this one. I wanted to give him a dark and sinister look, so I went for black, with a little gold and red. I had actually planned to do only the straps the hold his armour in red, but somewhere along the route I felt he needed more colour so I did the clothing in red as well. Not sure why he turned so glossy, since the other minis I varnished in that session  (the Légère above) turned flat.

Samurai or rather the black Ronin

Samurai or rather the black Ronin

Samurai or rather the black Ronin

Samurai or rather the black Ronin

I am also making some (limited) progress on the Byzantines. The Warlord and the first two points of mounted bow Heathguards are finished and the same goes for the Warlord. Now I will only need to varnish them and do the basing. So lets just say, that they have been held up at Security! 😉

125483113552

 

2tes Battalion, 12te Reserveinfanterie (Brandenburg Infantrieregiement)

These minis have gone a real long way. I started with these in late September just before a started the new job and for that very job they took me into November to finish. Now due to said job and the remodelling of the kitchen (which turned from a simple “we are going to put some fresh paint onto the walls” into a major renovation) it took me almost another month to base them. But here they are.

12tes Preussisches Reserveinfanterie Regiment, Knötel Cigarette Card

12tes Preussisches Reserveinfanterie Regiment, Knötel Cigarette Card

Now on to the history part. In the words of Peter F. from Calpe Miniatures (who sculpted these fine minis by the way):

The 12th line is the closest you can get to a crack reserve regiment. As reserve battalions of the Leib infantry regiment, the two musketeer battalions of this regiment had already seen action before the 1813 armistice. With the removal of the Guard from the line, these two battalions, together with a reserve battalion from the First West Prussian regiment, were the first of the reserve battalions to attain line status. They were then present at every major engagement in which the Prussian army was involved during the 1813-15 period.

Most interesting are their uniforms.Most of the men in the 2nd Battalion wore regulation uniform, but with white linen trousers and (mostly) without gaiters. The rest of the men wore the same uniforms as the men from the 1st Battalion. And those wore Black single breasted reservists jackets with poppy-red collar patches. No tails or shoulder straps were worn. Buttons were of white metal, though some sources state these were covered in the same material as the jacket. No matter the jacket, they all wore white cross-belts and a wide mix of canvas and regulation backpacks. The officers wore regulation uniforms. The nice thing about them is… they retained these uniforms even after they became part of the line, so these minis will be really versatile.

As usual, these minis are based for Republic to Empire. At Möckern they were 530 men strong, which translates into 26 minis plus two skirmishers. Obviously 26 does not properly divide by four, so one base has six minis instead of the usual four.  When it comes to the painting front… I decided I wanted a slightly faded look for the black jackets, but did not want for the grey most people use in these cases. So I went for an iron oxide black base, which is a very dark brown and highlighted that with grey. Hope this meets everyone’s approval. What else is there to say… well the flag is by GMB and I tried something slightly different when it comes to the basing for the skirmishers (but more on that in another post).

12te Reserveinfanterie (in line without skirmishers)

12te Reserveinfanterie (in line without skirmishers)

12te Reserveinfanterie (in line with skirmishers)

12te Reserveinfanterie (in line with skirmishers)

12te Reserveinfanterie (1st base)

12te Reserveinfanterie (1st base)

12te Reserveinfanterie (2nd base)

12te Reserveinfanterie (2nd base)

12te Reserveinfanterie (Command base - front view)

12te Reserveinfanterie (Command base – front view)

12te Reserveinfanterie (Command base - side view)

12te Reserveinfanterie (Command base – side view)

12te Reserveinfanterie (4th base)

12te Reserveinfanterie (4th base)

12te Reserveinfanterie (5th base)

12te Reserveinfanterie (5th base)

12te Reserveinfanterie (6th base)

12te Reserveinfanterie (6th base)

12te Reserveinfanterie (Skirmishers)

12te Reserveinfanterie (Skirmishers)

What is next… well I started painting the 1st Battalion for the 37émè Legére last weekend and they should actually be finished soonish… lets see ow long they actually take! 😉

 
20 Comments

Posted by on December 10, 2012 in Calpe, Nap.: Prussian, Napoleonic, Republic to Empire

 

5te Schlesische Landwehr Kavallerie

Schlesische Landwehr Kavallerie, Knoetel Band XIV, Bild 3

Schlesische Landwehr Kavallerie
[Knötel Band XIV, Bild 3]

The latest unit to leave my painting table was the 5te Schlesische Landwehr Kavallerie, again for my Völkerschlacht / Möckern project. Like all the other Landwehr units Landwehr cavalry was raised from those men that were between 17 and 40 years of age and not serving in a regular unit. One interesting fact about them is that they were armed with the lance until 1816. As a result the Prussians even had more cavalry that can be classed at Lancers in the field at Waterloo than the French.

Just like their infantry brethren their training was no worse than with any regular unit, but their equipment often was. So their uniforms were often plainer, with less piping or fringe. [The trooper in the background of the Knötel print is representative of troopers during the 1813 period, while the one in the foreground is representative of the newer uniforms around the time of Waterloo.] tried to depict this here as well, leaving their cuffs in the colour of the coat, which was often the case with the Landwehr cavalry. While most Silesian Landwehr cavalry units used white sheepskin covers as saddle cloths, I intentionally went for black here. I wanted to depict them at the lower end of the supply “food chain”, so their horsecolours are less to regulation than with the other cavalry units I painted, with a higher number of light coloured horses. So to get a contrast I went for black sheepskin covers.

The minis are all from the Calpe range (except for the French casualty one of them is jumping his horse over, which comes from Perry). They are based for Republic to Empire and the pennants are from GMB (although I did bend them so much that I actually rubbed them thin and had to repaint them in many places). I have to say that I am happy, that this will be the last Silesian unit for this project. I was getting quiet sick with the yellow trim for the blue uniforms after painting three units of Silesian Landwehr already.

But now on to the photos. Please excuse the shine on the minis. The weather has really gotten poor here over the last few days and the varnish I use dries better with lots of UV light. But they will turn perfectly flat in a couple of weeks.

5te Schlesische Landwehr Kavallerie

5te Schlesische Landwehr Kavallerie

5te Schlesische Landwehr Kavallerie (1st base)

5te Schlesische Landwehr Kavallerie (1st base)

5te Schlesische Landwehr Kavallerie (command base)

5te Schlesische Landwehr Kavallerie (command base)

5te Schlesische Landwehr Kavallerie (2nd base)

5te Schlesische Landwehr Kavallerie (2nd base)

5te Schlesische Landwehr Kavallerie (1st base)

5te Schlesische Landwehr Kavallerie (3rd base)

5te Schlesische Landwehr Kavallerie

5te Schlesische Landwehr Kavallerie

 

 
18 Comments

Posted by on September 29, 2012 in Calpe, Nap.: Prussian, Napoleonic, Republic to Empire

 

Napoleons command base, the base (part 1)

Now that the main characters for the base are done, it is time to set our sights on the base itself. According to the R2E rules I have a maximum base size of 10cm square (or round) for an army commander. Now I do not only want the minis on the base, but also a little special terrain, so it was important to do a little test run. Here is the base with the minis arranged on it:

As you can see I marked their positions with a pencil and also sketched some other terrain features. The white blocky thing in the front is a Hirst Arts block with a field stone arch. As you might be able to see from my notes, the base is also to feature a pond, small dam, creek and a road. The field stone arch will depict part of a small sewer under the road. Once the minis were removed I sketched the rest of the features onto the base.

To look good the base needs three levels. The highest featuring the ground the minis are on, one slightly lower of the pond and ditch and the lowest for the creek. Now the difference between the medium and lowest level needs to be bigger to give the water gushing of the dam a nice look. For this I use thin isolation foam usually use to sound proof laminate flooring. I used four layers of it and cut it into the shape of the base. For this I sandwiched them between two bases, fixed them and cut along the edges.

Afterwards the markings I had made on the base at the beginning were transferred to the foam and the respective layers cut away. Especially along the creek this was a bit uneven, but it did not matter since this would be landscaped later on anyway. Now the layers were glued together and glued to a base (a new one, since I still wanted the one with my “notes”, in case I needed it later).

I now painted the edge of the foam where the dam and the arch would be black. These spaces would be hard to reach with a brush once they had been glued into place. Since the foam is a bright green, it would have looked ugly if it shone through, so better now then later. I cut of the edge of the arch (since it runs diagonally to the edge of the base) and sanded it down. I also added another block to the top of it and this was cut and sanded as well. Another block from the mould for damaged walls to give it an uneven look would complete the stone work.

The dam was build using a coffee stirrer and matchstick cut to size. All of this was now glued in place.

At this point I got a sinking feeling that the base would be too soft. This insulation board is somewhat flexible with a very smooth surface. And I was afraid, that the minis would provide too much of a handle and break off during gameplay if mounted directly to the foam. So I cut some thick card to match the terrain and glued in on top the base, to create a sandwich and a stable ground for the minis. I filled the larger gash in the bank with plaster and covered the banks and ditch with wood filler for the final landscaping. Why wood filler? If you mix it with a little water you get a very fine grain structure, that can be painted over to depict soil. Since I want to build the water using modelling water I did not want any sand being poured onto the base after I did this, to make sure there would be no scratches. So I went for a material that would look the deal, but could be applied with a spatula.

I also painted the edges of the base over with white glue to hide a pores in the foam and mask the layers somewhat once the edge of the base is painted.

Up next came the first steps of painting. The “water” inside the pond and creek were painted in two shades of dark brown and washed with green to give a muddy look. The stones in three shades of grey and stippled with moss green to depict moss growing in the recesses between the stones. The dam was painted in faded browns and some dark greens (to depict algae growing on it of hanging down between the boards). Then I glued some fishing line from the top of the dam to the creek. This will later be covered with a water paste to depict the water gushing over the dam.

Last the banks of the creek were painted as well.

Now the edges of the base were painted olive-green to match the rest of my basing (although I am contemplating painting the upper parts brown since it is looking strange right now). The minis were glued to the base as well. Now I always knew that there would most likely be some space for other minis left on the base and this was the time check it out. On top of the road there was indeed some space. Either for a rider or two to three dismounted minis. I chose the latter. Why?

Now a diorama (and command bases are more like a diorama than anything else) always looks best, if it is not too geometric. This is called visual weight. Some spots should draw the eye more than others without any looking bare. And it is best if not everything is orientated along an edge. For this reason the roads runs diagonally over the base and not parallel to an edge and the minis are looking towards a spot off centre. To achieve the weight, all the riders are on one side of the base, with the lesser characters (the ADC and Mameluke Ali) compressed into a corner, while the main characters (Bonaparte and Soult) have more space. The dam and arch draw the eye, but their lower lever keeps the focus on the mounted characters. Now adding another mounted mini would have shifted the looks towards that side of the base and would have given more visual weight to the ADC and Ali. Two foot minis, with plainer uniforms look “lighter” on the other hand and do not draw as much attention. Also their lower hight creates a spiral on the base, going from the important characters, to the lesser ones, to the foot minis and down to the terrain on the lower level. I also picked only two minis since it looked too “heavy” when I put a third in the group.

I picked another Maréchal / General and a Carabinier officer from Perry Miniatures for this and these shall be painted now.

After the glue had dried, I filled the space between the integral bases of the minis and down the road with more filler, leaving the spot where the minis on foot will be bare. I also applied the water paste to the fishing line yesterday and poured some water into the pond and creek. I took no photos of that yet, since I did not want to move the base before the water had settled, so you will see those in the next installment. I do not know, when that will be though. I will be away till early September and I am not sure yet, if I will get any work done until I leave. So keep your eyes peeled!

 

Henry William Paget, 1. Marquess of Anglesey, Earl of Uxbridge

Henry William Paget, 1. Marquess of Anglesey, Earl of Uxbridge

So the minis for the Lord Uxbridge base have been for some days now, but they had been causing some problems. First of all the photos I took of the finished models before basing them (and I mean all of them) turned out somewhat blurry. Not sure if it was the sensor or anything, but bottom line is… they were useless and I could not post a final WIP. Sorry about that! When I applied the first coat of varnish it turned glossy (new can that I probably did not shake well enough) and it took another three coats to turn it matt. This took some time, since I had wait for each coat to dry completely through. But on Saturday it finally turned matt and I could work on the basing. Before I go on to the photos here is some info on the big man himself:

Henry William Paget was born in London, as Henry Bayly (his father assumed the name Paget in 1770), he was the eldest son of Henry Paget, 1st Earl of Uxbridge, by his wife Jane, daughter of the Very Reverend Arthur Champagné, Dean of Clonmacnoise, Ireland.  He was the oldest brother to Captain William Paget, Sir Arthur Paget, General Sir Edward Paget, Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Paget and Berkeley.

At first he entered politics and became a member of parliament at the 1790 general election as member for Caernarfon in Wales. He held this seat until the 1796 general election when his brother Edward was elected unopposed in his place. He then represented Milborne Port from 1796 until he resigned his seat in 1804 by appointment as Steward of the Chiltern Hundreds, and again from the 1806 election to January 1810, when he took the Chiltern Hundreds again.

At the outbreak of the French Revolutionary Wars, Paget raised the regiment of Staffordshire volunteers and was given the temporary rank of lieutenant-colonel in 1793. As the 80th Foot, the corps took part in the Flanders campaign of 1794 under Paget’s command. In 1795 he was made a lieutenant-colonel of the 16th Light Dragoons. In 1796 he was made a colonel and by 1801 he had become colonel of the 7th Light Dragoons. In 1802 he was promoted major-general, and six years later lieutenant-general. He commanded the cavalry for Sir John Moore’s army during the 1809 Corunna campaign. His only war service from 1809 to 1815 was in the disastrous Walcheren expedition (1809), in which he commanded a division.

In 1815, he was appointed cavalry commander in Belgium. On the eve of Waterloo, Paget had his command extended by Wellington so as to include the whole of the allied cavalry and horse artillery. He handily covered the retirement of the Anglo-Allies from Quatre Bras to Waterloo on 17 June, and on 18 June led the spectacular cavalry charge of the British centre, which checked and in part routed D’Erlon’s corps d’armée. One of the last cannon shots fired that day hit Paget in the right leg, necessitating its amputation.

Henry William Paget, 1. Marquess of Anglesey, Earl of Uxbridge

Henry William Paget, 1. Marquess of Anglesey, Earl of Uxbridge

In 1819 Paget, now Marquess of Anglesey, became full general and at the coronation of George IV, he acted as Lord High Steward of England. In April 1827, he became a member of the Canning administration, taking the post of Master-General of the Ordnance and becoming a member of the Privy Council. Under the Wellington administration, he accepted the appointment of Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (March 1828). In December 1828, he addressed a letter to the Roman Catholic primate of Ireland stating his belief in the need for Catholic emancipation, which led to his recall by the government. On the formation of Earl Grey’s administration in November 1830, he again became lord-lieutenant of Ireland. In July 1833, the ministry resigned over the Irish question, he spent thirteen years out of office, then joined Lord John Russell’s administration in July 1846 as master-general of the ordnance, finally retiring in March 1852 with the rank of field-marshal and colonel of the Royal Horse Guards. He also held the honorary posts of Lord Lieutenant of Anglesey between 1812 and 1854 and Lord Lieutenant of Staffordshire between 1849 and 1854.

Lord Anglesey died April 29, 1854, and was buried at Lichfield Cathedral, where a monument is erected to his honour.

He was quiet a fertile character. He fathered eight children with his first wife, Lady Caroline Elizabeth Villiers, from whom he was divorced in 1810. And another nine with Lady Charlotte Cadogan, former wife of Lord Henry Wellesley, Wellington’s brother.

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

 

Offensive French Artillery finished

Offensive French Artillery finished

After I posted a review of Offensive Miniatures French artillery a short while ago, I also wanted to have a go at painting them. And they did not disappoint at all. They are nice to paint and offered a lot of detail. So much so that I thought I would go mad painting the highlights on all that red. 😉

The guns are based for Republic to Empire and I have to say, with 6 minis to a base they are quiet crowded. So much so, that I left the ammo chests I painted up as well off.  In retrospect I think I might have gone and based them with 4 crew each and bought two additional guns. But this way there is more action to the bases. I went and changed some mini around between crews to make each base look unique and I think this paid off.

French artillery battery (Offensive Miniatures)

French artillery battery
[Offensive Miniatures]

French 12pdr 1

French 12pdr

French 12pdr 2

French 12pdr

French 12pdr

French 12pdr

French 6" Howitzer

French 6″ Howitzer

French artillery battery (an XI)

French artillery battery (Gribeauval system)

 

37eme – 2 Légère

37eme – 2 Légère

After a long hiatus on this blog here we go with another post. and another unit for my Völkerschlacht von Leipzig / Möckern project. This time it is not Prussians, but French. Or namely the 2nd battalion of the 37eme Légère.

The 37eme actually had a pretty short service record. It was created in 1812 from various reserve companies and was the highest numbered Légère Regiment under Napoleon (and I fear in all French history as well). It fought at Lutzen, Bautzen, Dresden, Wendisch-Carsdorff, Falkenkayn, Leipzig, and Hanau in 1813 and Saint-Avold, Vassy, La Rothiere, Brienne, Champaubert, Vauchamps, Mormans, Meaux, Reims, and Paris in 1814. After Napoleons abdication it was disbanded and not raised again after his restoration. It never managed to gain battle honours to its flag.

At Leipzig / Möckern the second battalion started with exactly 400 men which under the Republic to Empire rules means 20 minis. Since they are light infantry and thus able to deploy the full regiment as skirmishers, all but the command stand are on half bases.

The minis used here are all Perry plastics, with the cuffs cut of and the pointed cuffs of the Légère painted on. I was not too sure if I should really use three shades of blue for their uniforms to depict different grades of fading (at one point I actually thought about repainting them halfway through), but in the end I actually like the results. I also decided to try something new with the eyes. Recently I have grown ever unhappier with the way they looked on my minis. Not sure why, since in the past these turned out better. So I decided to black line them… maybe a change in technique will bring me edge back here. Not entirely happy yet, but I think this might progress into something good!

37eme - 2 Légère

37eme – 2 Légère

37eme - 2 Légère (Carabiniers)

37eme – 2 Légère (Carabiniers)

For the Carabiners I chose a brighter red then I usually do for Grenadiers to show the difference between Ligne and Légère. Only thing I forgot was that I had not proper highlight colour for this red, so in the end I shaded it instead of highlighting it and ended up with the virtually same brightness as I do with my Grenadiers.

37eme - 2 Légère (Chasseuers 1st and 2nd Coy.)

37eme – 2 Légère (Chasseuers 1st and 2nd Coy.)

37eme - 2 Légère (battalion command)

37eme – 2 Légère (battalion command)

The Eagle for the flagstaff was recut into a spearhead, since only the first battalion was issued with an eagle.

37eme - 3 Légère (Chasseuers 3rd and 4th Coy.)

37eme – 3 Légère (Chasseuers 3rd and 4th Coy.)

37eme - 3 Légère (Voltigeurs)

37eme – 3 Légère (Voltigeurs)

For the Voltigeurs I chose yellow as opposed to yellow / green or yellow / red epaluettes and pompoms. I wanted to depict the simplicity in uniform of a unit raised after the high losses in Russian and this was a way to do so.

37eme - 3 Légère (skirmish deployment)

37eme – 3 Légère (skirmish deployment)

Next up I shall commence work on Uxbridge and his ADC´s for the La Bricole painting challenge, so stay tuned for that!

 
 

The 200th aniversary of Salmanca or more importantly…

… the start of the second La Bricole painting competition!

To sum things up, you can enter any command base or vignette (or more than one if you like) in any scale as long as the base is 12cm or less in its biggest dimension. The competition starts today and ends on September 30th and the only condition is that you may not have started painting the minis before today (cleaning, converting and priming them is fine). There are no prices, this is only for glory and more importatnly honour.

This time I plan for two entries, mainly on the grounds that I could not decide which one to go for. As strange as it sounds, I am going to start with my safety or fall back project which is Henry William Paget, 1. Marquess of Anglesey, known to most people as the Earl of Uxbridge. The command base will show him at Waterloo with three of his four aides-de-camp… Major Thronhill (7th Hussars), Captain Seymour (18th Hussars) and Captain Wildmann (7th Hussars). They will be based on a 8cm x 8cm base for Republic to Empire.

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

Lord Uxbridge and ADC´s

The minis are all Perry. Uxbridge comes from BH2 the high command pack, the rest of the minis are from BH33 “British Light Dragoon Command on standing horses” with some slight conversion. The biggest conversion was the bugler (now Captain Seymour) who needed the horn removed, arm repositioned, a new hand sculpted on and another head.

But more on all these when I paint them. I will only finish the unit I have on my table right now (3rd battalion of the 37eme Légère) and I shall commence work on these.

So what is the second or main project? Well that shall remain a secret for now, but I can tell you that it´s main character is an Onion. This does not make sense? Well it is a riddle! Have your guesses! 😉

Onion

Onion